John Harding’s book, Escape from Paradise – Paperback and Kindle Versions


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Now, available in Kindle and Paperback! Free Kindle if you purchase Paperback. After buying Paperback, go for the free Kindle!

It took me two and a half evenings to complete your un-put-downable book…it is a unique contribution to the appreciation of a life in Singapore. Thank you for having written it. C. V. Devan Nair, former President of Singapore.

Bought the book from Select this weekend and can’t put it down! It’s a great read! And so nostalgic for me—the good old days! Glen Goei, writer and director of the Miramax film That’s the Way I Like It and who played the title role opposite Anthony Hopkins in the London production of M. Butterfly. Mr. Goei’s latest film is The Blue Mansion – Click for the trailer!

It is a remarkable story and so full of intrigue that it reads at times like fiction.Jonathan Burnham, Editor in Chief & President, Talk Miramax Books.

“It’s quite a story The legendary Alice Mayhew, Vice-President & Editorial Director, Simon & Schuster.

This book out-Dallas, Dallas. No one has written so well of the other side of paradise,Francis T. Seow, former Solicitor General of Singapore

ThunderBall Films is successfully putting together the movie production of Escape from Paradise and has received a new LOI (Letter of Intent) from actress Bai Ling who starred with Richard Gere in the film Red Cross.

This includes a commitment from a CPA firm who does tax credit financing in Ireland, a possible location to film, as part of the package needed for investors – along with the CPA firm’s commitment to apply for and finance the tax credits if ThunderBall does shoot in Ireland and what portion of the budget they would provide.
For inquiries, please contact John Harding at jbharding@gmail.com.

Escape from Paradise – the Promotional Trailer

Mideast protests ignite after Saudi Arabia beheads 47

See Who supports ISIS

Since Saudi Arabia beheaded 47 people on Saturday, January 2, anger has spread throughout the Middle East.

Shia Muslim cleric Nimr al-Nimr was beheaded on Saturday alongside 46 other “convicts.” Nimr al-Nimr was a fervent dissident against the Sunni Muslim Saudi royal family – a capital crime in Saudi Arabia.

Later that night, protesters set fire to the Saudi Embassy in Tehran as Iranian President Hassan Rouhani condemned al-Nimr’s execution.

The split between Sunnis and Shiites dates back to the early days of Islam.

Iran accuses Saudi Arabia of supporting terrorism because it backs Syrian rebel groups including ISIS fighting with the United States to oust President Bashar Assad.

Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guard said Saudi Arabia’s “medieval act of savagery” would lead to the “downfall” of the country’s monarchy.

Saudi Arabia’s Foreign Ministry said that by condemning the execution, Iran had “revealed its true face represented in support for terrorism.”

Protesters took to the streets across the region. In Bahrain, police used water cannons and fired birdshot at demonstrators, wounding some. In al-Daih, west of the capital, Shiite protesters chanted against Saudi Arabia’s ruling Sunni Al Saud family, as well as against Bahrain’s ruling Sunni Al Khalifa family. Anti-Saudi demonstrators marched in Lebanon, Turkey, India and Pakistan.

The cleric’s execution has threatened to complicate Saudi Arabia’s relationship with Iran’s Shiite-led government in Iraq, where the Saudi Embassy was preparing to reopen for the first time in nearly 25 years. On Saturday, there were calls for the embassy to be shut down again.

Authorities shot al-Nimr in the leg during the arrest, and his family said that he had been denied proper treatment for his wounds during his imprisonment—much of which was spent in solitary confinement. Meanwhile, al-Nimr’s family prepared for three days of mourning at a mosque in al-Awamiya in the kingdom’s al-Qatif region in predominantly Shiite eastern Saudi Arabia where the nation’s oil fields are located. Saudi officials informed his family that the cleric had been buried in an undisclosed cemetery, an indication that he had been severely tortured – a common practice in Saudi Arabia.

The author, John Harding, has lived and worked in Saudi Arabia for nine  years.

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