John Harding’s book, Escape from Paradise – Paperback and Kindle Versions


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Now, available in Kindle and Paperback! Free Kindle if you purchase Paperback. After buying Paperback, go for the free Kindle!

It took me two and a half evenings to complete your un-put-downable book…it is a unique contribution to the appreciation of a life in Singapore. Thank you for having written it. C. V. Devan Nair, former President of Singapore.

Bought the book from Select this weekend and can’t put it down! It’s a great read! And so nostalgic for me—the good old days! Glen Goei, writer and director of the Miramax film That’s the Way I Like It and who played the title role opposite Anthony Hopkins in the London production of M. Butterfly. Mr. Goei’s latest film is The Blue Mansion – Click for the trailer!

It is a remarkable story and so full of intrigue that it reads at times like fiction.Jonathan Burnham, Editor in Chief & President, Talk Miramax Books.

“It’s quite a story The legendary Alice Mayhew, Vice-President & Editorial Director, Simon & Schuster.

This book out-Dallas, Dallas. No one has written so well of the other side of paradise,Francis T. Seow, former Solicitor General of Singapore

ThunderBall Films is successfully putting together the movie production of Escape from Paradise and has received a new LOI (Letter of Intent) from actress Bai Ling who starred with Richard Gere in the film Red Cross.

This includes a commitment from a CPA firm who does tax credit financing in Ireland, a possible location to film, as part of the package needed for investors – along with the CPA firm’s commitment to apply for and finance the tax credits if ThunderBall does shoot in Ireland and what portion of the budget they would provide.
For inquiries, please contact John Harding at jbharding@gmail.com.

Escape from Paradise – the Promotional Trailer

Obama and Bush’s failed states

As Kerry with an nutty look proposes boots on the ground, his wife wonders

As Kerry, with a nutty look, proposes boots on the ground, his wife, Teresa, wonders…

Syria

If Congress votes “no” on a resolution calling for U.S. intervention in Syria’s civil war, says McCain, it would be “catastrophic” for U.S. credibility in the world.

Because Barack Obama, two years ago, said “Assad must go,” and, one year ago, said any use of chemical weapons crosses his “red line,” Congress has no choice but to plunge America into yet another Mideast war. The Syrian civil war is mainly a war against Shias (sometimes called Shiites) and Sunnis – the Shias are with Al-Assad, and the Sunnis being the rebels. In this case, the Sunnis consist mainly of members of Al Qaeda, the Muslim Brotherhood, and other jihadist groups.

Let’s not forget that Obama was born into a Sunni Muslim family.

Now even Senator McCain, who believes Al Nusra are good rebels has said (on Fox), “For someone to say Allahu Akbar, it is about as offensive as someone saying thank God.” Really? Would any sane person dare say “Allahu Akbar” walking down Main Street in America?

Even Kerry denied any major role of al-Qaeda in Syria. For which President Vladimir Putin accusing U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry of lying by playing down the role of al-Qaida with rebel forces.

“He is lying and knows he is lying. It’s sad.”

Kerry let’s it out – Boots on the ground in Syria

Ambassador Kerry told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee he would prefer not to bar the use of ground troops in Syria to preserve President Barack Obama’s options if Syria “imploded” or there was a threat of chemical weapons being obtained by extremists. “I don’t want to take off the table an option that might or might not be available to a president of the United States to secure our country,” Kerry told the committee.

Slipping into a nutty Dr. Strangelove mode, Kerry continued, “But in the event Syria imploded, for instance, or in the event there was a threat of a chemical weapons cache falling into the hands of Al Nusra [according to Senator McCain, the good rebels] or someone else, and it was clearly in the interest of our allies and all of us—the British, the French and others—to prevent those weapons of mass destruction falling into the hands of the worst elements, I don’t want to take off the table an option that might or might not be available to a president of the United States to secure our country.”

As was the case with Iraq, for the possible war with Syria, no proof has been submitted to prove that Al-Assad was behind the Sarin gas attack. Even the rebels have been caught with supplies of Sarin gas. This “intelligence” parallels the false “proof” of weapons of mass destruction against Iraq.

However, Senator McCain’s favorite Syrian Al Nusra rebels in the Damascus suburb of Ghouta have admitted to Associated Press correspondent Dale Gavlak that they were responsible for last week’s chemical weapons incident which western powers have blamed on Bashar Al-Assad’s forces, revealing that the casualties were the result of an accident caused by rebels mishandling chemical weapons.

Here is the link: http://www.globalresearch.ca/jabhat-al-nusra-rebels-admit-responsibility-for-chemical-weapons-attack/5347485.

The failure and falsification of U.S. intelligence

U.S. and allied intelligence services are still trying to work out who ordered the gas attack in Damascus.

No direct link to President Bashar al-Assad or his inner circle has been publicly demonstrated.

This is one of the biggest gaps in U.S. understanding of the incident, even as Congress debates whether to launch limited strikes on Assad’s forces in retaliation.

Much of the U.S. claim that the Syrian government is responsible was initially based on reports from witnesses, non-governmental groups and hours of YouTube videos.

The bottom line is that U.S. officials have not presented any scientific evidence to the public or intelligence information proving that sarin gas was used or that the Syrian government used it.

An analysis by the Congressional Research Service admitted that any evidence of who was responsible for the attace “was not watertight.”

Still, Obama, McCain and most of the U.S. media speak freely that the attack was not the fault of al Qaeda and the rebels.

After wrongly claiming that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction before the 2003 U.S. invasion, the U.S. intelligence community must be considered to be suspect and politically motivated.

Shades of the false intelligence spread by Bush, Cheney, and Colin Powell.

Libya

Quick fact: Under Gaddafi, Libyans enjoyed free electricity.

After the U.S. bombing, disguised under the pretense of maintaining a “no-fly zone,” Libya has virtually stopped producing oil as the government has lost control of the country to Islamic militias.

Libyan rebels have taken over Libya’s oil ports on the Mediterranean as they seek to sell crude oil on the black market. Now production of Libya’s prized high-quality crude oil has plunged from 1.4 million barrels a day earlier this year to just 160,000 barrels a day. Armed groups in Libya are currently blocking key oilfields and ports—hijacking Libya of its main source of revenue leading fuel shortages and blackouts.

Libyans are increasingly at the mercy of militias which act outside the law. Foreigners have fled Benghazi since the American ambassador, Chris Stevens, was murdered in the US consulate by jihadist militiamen last September.

The Libyan government is now dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood, as most if not all of its weaponry including ground to air missiles has been given to jihadists in Syria and throughout the Middle East, and northern Africa.

Torture sometimes resulting in death, is “widespread” in Libyan jails, according to a new UN report. The UN estimates about 8,000 people are still being held in relation to the 2011 conflict which ended in the overthrow of Col Gaddafi. The vast majority of prisoners are being held without due process.

Libya is a failed state, and a country beginning to split up.

Iraq

In Iraq, the car bombs and killings continue to escalate. A string of coordinated car bombs struck around Baghdad at dusk on Sept. 3rd, killing at least 46 people, in violence that is pulling the country back toward the worst days of the last decade.

The bombings in Baghdad, likely carried out by Iraq’s resurgent al-Qaida affiliate, struck Shiite neighborhoods. The attacks followed a similar round of bombings less than a week ago in the capital that killed at least 65 people.

The suicide attacks, bombings and death tolls are as bad as those of the worst months of the Iraq War in 2007, when Sunni-backed al-Qaeda terrorists and Shiite militias were killing each other in huge numbers.

The violence in Iraq returned only a few months after President Obama ordered all U.S. troops out  by December 2011. Shiite and Sunni Muslims have clashed over government policies, and the civil war in neighboring Syria has pitted Sunnis against Shiites as well.

This year alone, almost 5,000 people have been killed with another 12,000 injured in Iraq, according to the United Nations. This level of violence has not been seen since 2006 and 2007. Not to praise Sadaam Husein, but he was non-sectarian and did not take sides in the centuries-old Suni Shia war.

The battle for Iraq is between the U.S.-installed Shiite government, which is closely allied to Iran, and the Sunni al-Qaida elements.

Iraq is a failed state as the Shiite government is unable to bring to an end the ever-increasing number of car bombings and attacks on its pro-Iranian Shiite community.

Afghanistan (forever)

As of Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013, at least 2,133 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan. Since Afghanistan is a corrupt and failed state, there is no end of U.S. military deaths in the country.

Confirming this, Lt. Gen. Mark Milley, the commander of NATO ground forces in Afghanistan says there have been no discussions that the coalition would completely withdraw after 2014, despite continued uncertainty in political negotiations over the future of the international military effort.

“We have no indication whatsoever of a withdrawal completely from Afghanistan,” he told Stars and Stripes in a September 2nd  interview at his headquarters in Kabul. “We are going to change our mission, and we are going to reduce in size and scope.” He called the term “withdrawal” a misnomer.

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