Up Close with Lee Kuan Yew: Insights from colleagues and friends

John Harding’s book, Escape from Paradise – Paperback and Kindle Versions


Click!

Now, available in Kindle and Paperback! Free Kindle if you purchase Paperback. After buying Paperback, go for the free Kindle!

It took me two and a half evenings to complete your un-put-downable book…it is a unique contribution to the appreciation of a life in Singapore. Thank you for having written it. C. V. Devan Nair, former President of Singapore.

Bought the book from Select this weekend and can’t put it down! It’s a great read! And so nostalgic for me—the good old days! Glen Goei, writer and director of the Miramax film That’s the Way I Like It and who played the title role opposite Anthony Hopkins in the London production of M. Butterfly. Mr. Goei’s latest film is The Blue Mansion – Click for the trailer!

It is a remarkable story and so full of intrigue that it reads at times like fiction.Jonathan Burnham, Editor in Chief & President, Talk Miramax Books.

“It’s quite a story The legendary Alice Mayhew, Vice-President & Editorial Director, Simon & Schuster.

This book out-Dallas, Dallas. No one has written so well of the other side of paradise,Francis T. Seow, former Solicitor General of Singapore

ThunderBall Films is successfully putting together the movie production of Escape from Paradise and has received a new LOI (Letter of Intent) from actress Bai Ling who starred with Richard Gere in the film Red Cross.

This includes a commitment from a CPA firm who does tax credit financing in Ireland, a possible location to film, as part of the package needed for investors – along with the CPA firm’s commitment to apply for and finance the tax credits if ThunderBall does shoot in Ireland and what portion of the budget they would provide.
For inquiries, please contact John Harding at jbharding@gmail.com.

Escape from Paradise – the Promotional Trailer

Singapore gay sex law punishes men, not women

A Singapore lawyer, Mr.  M.  Ravi, is challenging a law which criminalizes gay sex between men, arguing that Section 377A violates the constitutional rights of homosexual men.

Women?  Strangely, in Singapore, sex acts between lesbians is legal.

This is Mr.  Ravi’s third attempt after similar appeals failed earlier this year.

He is pegging his bid to a case he handled – that of a Mr.  Tan, 48, who was initially charged under 377A with performing fellatio on another man in a public toilet at CityLink Mall in March of last year.

When Mr Ravi filed a constitutional challenge then, Attorney-General’s Chambers cleverly replaced the charge with the lesser one of committing an obscene act in public.

Tan was convicted under that law and fined $3,000, as was his partner, a Mr.  Chin, 41.  Tan was then unemployed, and Chin, an operations clerk.  Apparently since Chin was on the receiving end, so to speak, he committed no crime.

Yesterday, Mr Ravi asked the Court of Appeal to overturn Justice Lai’s decision and allow the constitutional challenge to be heard.

He said that although Parliament has said gay men will not be prosecuted for sexual acts in private, the very existence of the law means they face the possible threat of prosecution.

He added that it is discriminatory that gay sex in public places can bring a jail term of up to two years, while sex between a man and a woman in public can result in only a three-month jail term at most—a mere slap on the but.

Lesbians can run wild and do whatever they want, making Singapore a Lesbian Heaven.

Deputy Public Prosecutor Aedit Abdullah, arguing that there was no basis for the constitutional challenge, as Tan had already pleaded guilty to the lesser offense of committing an obscene act in a public place.

Since Tan was not prosecuted under 377A, Mr Ravi had no standing to argue that his client’s constitutional rights were being violated by that particular law, the prosecutor said.

The prosecutor told Appeal Judges Andrew Phang, V.  K.  Rajah, and embarrassed red-faced Justice Judith Prakash, however, that there could be no “binding promise” that gay men would not be prosecuted under 377A.

The public gallery was packed with people, well-wishers, gays, lesbians, and a slew of lawyers.

Naturally, for legal decorum, the males in the public gallery were kept in check by the heroic efforts of  a squad of court bailiffs.

There was no report of lesbian activity in the public gallery, nor could there have been—the law does not apply to women.

2 comments to Singapore gay sex law punishes men, not women