John Harding’s book, Escape from Paradise – Paperback and Kindle Versions


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Now, available in Kindle and Paperback! Free Kindle if you purchase Paperback. After buying Paperback, go for the free Kindle!

It took me two and a half evenings to complete your un-put-downable book…it is a unique contribution to the appreciation of a life in Singapore. Thank you for having written it. C. V. Devan Nair, former President of Singapore.

Bought the book from Select this weekend and can’t put it down! It’s a great read! And so nostalgic for me—the good old days! Glen Goei, writer and director of the Miramax film That’s the Way I Like It and who played the title role opposite Anthony Hopkins in the London production of M. Butterfly. Mr. Goei’s latest film is The Blue Mansion – Click for the trailer!

It is a remarkable story and so full of intrigue that it reads at times like fiction.Jonathan Burnham, Editor in Chief & President, Talk Miramax Books.

“It’s quite a story The legendary Alice Mayhew, Vice-President & Editorial Director, Simon & Schuster.

This book out-Dallas, Dallas. No one has written so well of the other side of paradise,Francis T. Seow, former Solicitor General of Singapore

ThunderBall Films is successfully putting together the movie production of Escape from Paradise and has received a new LOI (Letter of Intent) from actress Bai Ling who starred with Richard Gere in the film Red Cross.

This includes a commitment from a CPA firm who does tax credit financing in Ireland, a possible location to film, as part of the package needed for investors – along with the CPA firm’s commitment to apply for and finance the tax credits if ThunderBall does shoot in Ireland and what portion of the budget they would provide.
For inquiries, please contact John Harding at jbharding@gmail.com.

Escape from Paradise – the Promotional Trailer

Susan Lim appeals against Singapore High Court verdict

 

Dr. Susan Lim

Dr. Susan Lim

Dr. Susan Lim has taken the next step in her great medical ripoff. She has appealed the Singapore High Court’s decision to dismiss her attempt to stop the Singapore Medical Council (SMC) from trying her case.

She had been brought under review by the SMC for charging a wealthy patient from Brunei S$24.8 million (US$20 million). Dr. Lim maintains that she later gave the patient a S$12.1 million discount (US$9.8 million) shortly before the patient died—what a deal!

Dr. Lim stated that she was “dissatisfied with the decision of the Honorable Justice Philip Pillai given on the 26th day of May 2011.”

Her move to appeal means that, even though the Singapore High Court had dismissed her efforts to stop the SMC from trying her case, the second disciplinary committee appointed by the council cannot proceed until after her appeal is heard—which buys Dr. Lim some time, but does not do much to sway the court. In Singapore, her action does just the opposite.

Dr Lim will now have two months in which to file the grounds of her appeal.

Justice Pillai had dismissed Dr Lim’s applications to quash and prohibit the SMC from looking further into allegations that she had overcharged her wealthy Bruneian patient, calling Dr Lim’s allegations “weightless,” her arguments “strained” and her assertions “bald.”

Dr Lim said that her decision to apply for a judicial review of the SMC’s disciplinary process was, in part, prompted by something Singapore’s Chief Justice had said about how judicial review can meaningfully contribute to good governance.

“It really gave me a lot of comfort that I was doing the right thing, because what the chief justice said is that a judicial review is about the application by a private citizen to challenge the lawfulness of the governance of a public body,” she said.

Continuing on, Dr. Lim said, “I have the highest regard for the judicial system of Singapore and its leadership because I am a child of the soil. I, as a law-abiding Singaporean, submitted myself (to the disciplinary process).” But when she lost confidence in that process, she said she felt she had “the right to question.”

Dr Lim said she was not worried about what the SMC’s allegations of massive mark-ups and grossly inflated bills would do to her, but that she was concerned about the possible breach of confidentiality for her patient, who was a very private person. Sure.

And that, she said, was the impetus for her to write to then-foreign minister George Yeo—a letter which the SMC said amounted to a threat to the minister and another attempt by Dr Lim to “subvert the legal process.”

Dr. Lim bragged, “I know George personally. Why would I threaten him? What I wrote to him was in no way threatening. It was a letter written with such good intentions. And I would do it again to protect my patient’s confidentiality.”

Unfortunately for Dr. Lim, former Singapore foreign-minister George Yeo, was roundly defeated in Singapore’s recent election, and now is out on the street.

Even worse, her attacking George Yeo, the Singapore SMC and the Singapore courts, is not winning over friends in Singapore.

Her actions show that she is completely out of touch with the reality of Singapore—as much as she was when she overcharged her dying patient by millions.

Here is the timeline:

Timeline

  • Oct 2001: Pengiran Anak Hajah Damit, younger sister of the Queen of Brunei, comes to see Dr Susan Lim with advanced-stage cancer.
  • May 2004: The Queen of Brunei asks Dr Lim to take a look at her sister as she cannot walk. Subsequently, Pengiran agrees to come to Singapore for treatment if Dr Lim acts as her primary physician.
  • 2007: The year of dispute. Patient becomes very ill and Dr Lim says she and her team spend 153 days of the year working intensively on her patient.
  • July 2007: Brunei’s Ministry of Health (MOHB) expresses concern about Dr Lim’s bill (then $24.8 million).
  • Aug 2007: Dr Lim sends her final discounted bill of $12.1 million to MOHB. Patient dies some days later.
  • End-Aug 2007: MOHB writes to Singapore’s Ministry of Health (MOHS) about Dr Lim’s bill.
  • Nov 2007: ‘Don’t pay me then.’ Dr Lim tells Brunei not to pay her anything except the third-party costs.
  • Jan 2009: Meeting between Dr Lim and MOHB, in which Dr Lim says she held firm to her invoiced amount of $12.1 million.
  • Jan 2010: Disciplinary inquiry into Dr Lim’s charges begins.
  • July 2010: First disciplinary committee recuses itself.
  • Sept 2010: Second disciplinary committee is convened. Dr Lim subsequently applies for a judicial review.
  • May 2011: High Court dismisses her applications for a judicial review.
  • June 2011: Dr Lim files notice of appeal against High Court decision.

Update: 3/3/2012

Susan Lim has sold her sea-facing bungalow in Sentosa Cove for S$39 million, a record price for the upmarket enclave. The plush residence has five bedrooms and an entertainment room and apparently was bought by an Indian national from the energy sector. Is Susan Lim planning to leave Singapore? Stay tuned…

1 comment to Susan Lim appeals against Singapore High Court verdict

  • Leech Others Blood

    Members of the Brunei loyal family are just low life leeches. They are just a bunch of cheap skate rich brats that leech on the blood and goodwill of people. A certain family member still own my brother in law a couple of hundreds of thousands dollars in the supply of services and equipment, have yet to pay their due after 18 years. They are so freaking rich and should have send their relative to a top medical facility in some white ass country for the treatment..The intention is to demand the best of service and not to pay. You freaking cheap skate royals, just paid your bills to Dr.Lim. A warning to all businessman, do not deal with members of the Brunei royal family if you do not wish your blood to be leech…They are just a bunch of vampires…Good luck to your case, Dr.Lim. Your chances of winning. Zip, Nil, kaput.. If any members of the royal is to consult you for cancer treatment, just send him/her on the way and you will be OK.